Pedir Um Café Em Portugal

Learn how to order a coffee in Portugal, a task more complex than it seems! There are several types available and the lingo can vary from city to city. Don’t miss out on Portugal’s coffee culture, an essential part of daily life!

Comments:

  • I really liked this shorty , it s really usefull, and extremely well done! I expected to find the expression “um café cheio” since that s the way I order my coffee around Lisboa and Cascais. Which one of the kinds of coffee mentioned in the shorty would correspond to “café cheio” then? 🙂

  • Hi, I am using these shorties for the first time. Great idea!
    3 comments
    1. I think the word ‘coffee’ right-hand column on page 1 in the transcription should be ‘café’.
    2. The expression ‘não passa de um “café de esquina” is translated as “it’s just a corner café “, how would you say the opposite, ie “It is not just a corner café “?
    3. ‘Atenção a chavena …’ on page 2 is not translated.
    Best wishes
    Declan

    • Thanks, Declan! We’ll check out 1. and 3. As for 2., to say “it’s not just a corner café”, you could say “Não é só um café de esquina” or “É mais do que um simples café de esquina” (It’s more than a simple corner café).

  • Thanks for Pedir Um Café Em Portugal. Nice explanation of all the different ways coffee is served, some of which I wasn’t aware of. The two most familiar of course are the galão which everybody seems to order for breakfast and the bica which is consumed round the clock but especially after meals. I knew you could order a Carioca if you wanted weaker coffee with less caffeine, but I was surprised to learn it is made by passing water through the grounds that have already served for another espresso. Makes it sound less appealing somehow! The article does forget to mention café descafeinado which in Portugal tastes amazingly like regular.

  • I think an important thing to mention in this would be that most of these are made with Steamed and/or frothed milk depending on where you buy it. So its more like a cappuccino than an espresso with some milk in it.

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