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26:17

Segredos da Pronúncia Nativa

March 3, 2020

In this episode, we once again analyze record audio clips from our brave listeners! We listen to the Shorty, “À Busca de Doces“, and explore how to make your Portuguese sound more native with pronunciation subtleties and word choice. We also clarify some other challenging concepts, such as the differences between “aí, ali, & lá”.

Que vs. O Que vs. Quê

February 10, 2020

When to use “Quê”

Quê What, that, which is the form generally used at the end of a sentence or clause, whether or not it’s an interrogative one.

You can’t end a sentence with que what, that, which so the choice is easy in these cases.

Não tens de quê! You’re welcome!

Disseste o quê? You said what?

Quê can also appear in other parts of a sentence, but that’s pretty much limited to the following two cases:

Interjeições

October 16, 2019

Interjections are words with an emotive function. They are used to express emotions, sensations, and moods. They can be just simple vowel sounds, like Ah! and Oh! , but most are either a free word or a phrase, in which case we call them locuções interjetivas.

The same interjeição interjection can have different meanings depending on the context in which it appears, its purpose, and the speaker’s attitude. Even with simple vowel sounds, sometimes changing the tone and extending the sound will give it another meaning.

Ai! Bati com o joelho na mesa. Ah! I hit the table with my knee.

Ai! Já me estou a passar contigo. Ah! You’re getting on my nerves.

Interjections can be used as a standalone reply / affirmation, or they can be followed by a sentence.

Basta! Enough!

Irra! Vocês não conseguem mesmo estar calados, pois não? Geez! You really can’t keep quiet, can you?

There’s practically an unlimited number of interjeições interjections, but below you will find the most common grouped by meaning/context.

Pretérito Imperfeito do Indicativo

September 2, 2019

In this learning note, we’ll discuss the Pretérito Imperfeito do Indicativo, which is the Portuguese equivalent to the past continuous tense in English grammar. For simplicity, we’ll refer to it as the Imperfeito Imperfect.

This tense is used to describe something that took place in the past that was ongoing or did not have a clear endpoint. It imparts this idea of continuity that the other pretéritos past tenses don’t have, which makes it ideal to narrate past events, as well as to describe past habits. 

Fui picado por mosquitos enquanto dormia. I was bitten by mosquitoes while I was sleeping.

Eu comia sopa todos os dias. I used to eat soup every day.

The first sentence mixes the Pretérito Perfeito Past Perfect (fui picado) with the Imperfeito Imperfect (dormia). We’ll compare both tenses further below in this article.

Conjugating Verbs in the Imperfeito

Conjugating regular verbs in the Imperfeito:

-ar verb ending -er/-ir verb ending
eu -ava -ia
tu -avas -ias
ele/ela/você -ava -ia
nós -ávamos -íamos
eles/elas/vocês -avam -iam

Three examples of irregular verbs in the Imperfeito: