Regular -ER/-IR Verbs in the Simple Past

-ER Verbs in the Simple Past

Regular verbs in the -ER group include escrever paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio to write and correr paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio to run. Let’s see how they would be conjugated in the pretérito perfeito paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio simple past:

verb-icon

escrever
to write

Indicativo

Escrever – Indicativo – Pretérito

Ele escreveu um livro.
He wrote a book.

  • eu escrevi
  • I wrote
  • tu escreveste
  • you wrote
  • ele / ela escreveu
  • he / she wrote
  • você escreveu
  • you formal wrote
  • nós escrevemos
  • we wrote
  • eles / elas escreveram
  • they masc. / they fem. wrote
  • vocês escreveram
  • you pl. wrote

{{{button}}}


verb-icon

correr
to run

Indicativo

Correr – Indicativo – Pretérito

Eu corri uma hora ontem.
I ran for an hour yesterday.

  • eu corri
  • I ran
  • tu correste
  • you ran
  • ele / ela correu
  • he / she ran
  • você correu
  • you formal ran
  • nós corremos
  • we ran
  • eles / elas correram
  • they masc. / they fem. ran
  • vocês correram
  • you pl. ran

{{{button}}}

Once you figure out the verb stems, which in this case are escrev- and corr-, you just add the correct ending (-i, -este, -eu, -emos, -eram). Notice that aside from the first person singular, the endings always start with e- for these -ER verbs. This is a good tip to get you started whenever you’re trying to remember the correct conjugations!

Here are couple more examples of common regular -ER verbs:

verb-icon

viver
to live

Indicativo

Viver – Indicativo – Pretérito

Eu vivi em Nova Iorque dois anos.
I lived in New York for two years.

  • eu vivi
  • I lived
  • tu viveste
  • you lived
  • ele / ela viveu
  • he / she lived
  • você viveu
  • you formal lived
  • nós vivemos
  • we lived
  • eles / elas viveram
  • they masc. / they fem. lived
  • vocês viveram
  • you pl. lived

{{{button}}}


verb-icon

comer
to eat

Indicativo

Comer – Indicativo – Pretérito

Nós comemos tanto no casamento!
We ate so much at the wedding!

  • eu comi
  • I ate
  • tu comeste
  • you ate
  • ele / ela comeu
  • he / she ate
  • você comeu
  • you formal ate
  • nós comemos
  • we ate
  • eles / elas comeram
  • they masc. / they fem. ate
  • vocês comeram
  • you pl. ate

{{{button}}}

-IR Verbs in the Simple Past

The regular endings for the -IR group are the same as the -ER group, except that they all start with i- instead of e- (-i, -iste, -iu, -imos, -iram).
Some examples of regular verbs in this group are partir paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio to leave, to break, dividir paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio to divide and decidir paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio to decide. Their respective verb stems are part-, divid-, and decid-. Let’s take a look at the conjugations:

verb-icon

partir
to leave / to break

Indicativo

Partir – Indicativo – Pretérito

Tu partiste o prato da minha avó.
You broke my grandmother’s plate.

  • eu parti
  • I left
  • tu partiste
  • you left
  • ele / ela partiu
  • he / she left
  • você partiu
  • you formal left
  • nós partimos
  • we left
  • eles / elas partiram
  • they masc. / they fem. left
  • vocês partiram
  • you pl. left

{{{button}}}


verb-icon

dividir
to share / to divide

Indicativo

Dividir – Indicativo – Pretérito

O professor dividiu a turma em dois grupos.
The teacher divided the class in two groups.

  • eu dividi
  • I shared
  • tu dividiste
  • you shared
  • ele / ela dividiu
  • he / she shared
  • você dividiu
  • you formal shared
  • nós dividimos
  • we shared
  • eles / elas dividiram
  • they masc. / they fem. shared
  • vocês dividiram
  • you pl. shared

{{{button}}}


verb-icon

decidir
to decide

Indicativo

Decidir – Indicativo – Pretérito

Ela decidiu mudar de casa.
She decided to move out of her house.

  • eu decidi
  • I decided
  • tu decidiste
  • you decided
  • ele / ela decidiu
  • he / she decided
  • você decidiu
  • you formal decided
  • nós decidimos
  • we decided
  • eles / elas decidiram
  • they masc. / they fem. decided
  • vocês decidiram
  • you pl. decided

{{{button}}}


 

Comments

  • Fantastic, I have never learn’t the simple past before. I found this most helpful and clear for the regular verbs.
    Muito obrigada
    Laura Parsons

  • So, the preterite and the present first person plural for ER and IR verbs are the same? i.e. “nós dividimos” can mean either “we divide” or “we divided”? Não gosto disso. 🙂

    • Yes, for regular ER and IR verbs, the presente do indicativo and pretérito perfeito do indicativo are both the same. So you have to rely on context. Haha, I don’t like it either!

  • Hello,
    So there’s no really difference in pronunciation of ‘dividimos’ (we share/ we shared)? And we can only verify by the context?
    Thanks.

  • As a French, I keep thinking that Portuguese is quite similar to French (both are romance languages) but also much simpler.
    * conjugations seem simpler (less exceptions, even though there are a few)
    * the pronunciation is very logical once we know the rules
    * and while French has many doubled letters that are sometimes easy to forget, Portuguese hasn’t (prometer – promettre, coluna – colonne, and so on)

    I think Portuguese may well be the easiest language to learn for French people. At least for me, it’s very pleasing 🙂

    • Olá, Matthieu. I’ve gotten mixed feedback from French speakers in general (maybe some just get frustrated because they can’t shake off the French R pronunciation!), but personally, I agree that there are enough similarities between Portuguese and French to give everyone an easier time 🙂 Just pay attention to false friends such as pourtant/portanto, normalement/normalmente, or ressenti/ressentir, and be careful with how you pronounce “au”, “eu” and “ou” in Portuguese!

  • I’ve also noticed the similarities between French and Portuguese, having studied French for many years in school. I personally find Portuguese harder, with a lot of tongue twisting pronunciation scenarios, as well as being harder to understand the spoken language with the way Portuguese “smushes” words together. I do remember though that verb conjugation in French was nasty.

What Did You Think? Leave Us a Comment Below:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


The subject is used only for admin purposes and won't be displayed in your comment.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.