Haver as “To Exist”/”To Have”

The first and easiest of Haver’s many uses is “to exist”. That is to say, the verb indicates that something exists somewhere. In English, the verb “to be” would typically be used in these contexts. Examples:
dois cadernos na tua secretária. There are two notebooks on your desk.
uma laranja podre no cesto da fruta. There is a rotten orange in the fruit basket.
cobertores no sótão. There are blankets in the attic.
This use of Haver is very easy to identify since sentences are usually structured as Haver + Object + Location of said object.
Sometimes, the location not mentioned. In this case, Haver sometimes means not only that something exists, but that that thing is for sale or being offered. Examples:
peixe fresco. We have fresh fish.
limão, chocolate, morango e baunilha. We have lemon, chocolate, strawberry, and vanilla.
café e chá, sirvam-se. There is coffee and tea, help yourselves to some.
This usage of Haver + Object is especially frequent in businesses – everywhere from restaurants to ice cream parlours to supermarkets!
NOTE: In Brazilian Portuguese, Haver as “to exist” is frequently replaced by the verb Ter (“to have”). This doesn’t usually happen in European Portuguese, except in certain contexts. Example:
limão, chocolate, morango e baunilha. We have lemon, chocolate, strawberry, and vanilla.
But also
Temos limão, chocolate, morango e baunilha. We have lemon, chocolate, strawberry, and vanilla.