Explicative Coordinating Conjunctions

Explicative coordinating conjunctions (conjunções coordenativas explicativas), link parts of the sentence to indicate a reason or explanation.
The most common are:
como paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio as  (used at the start of sentences)
porque paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio because (used in the middle of sentences)
pois paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio since (used in the middle of sentences)
Examples:
Acho que estou doente, porque tenho frio paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio I think I am sick because I feel cold
Como tenho frio, devo estar doente paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio As I feel cold, I must be sick
Explicative conjunctions are often used in combination with the “imperativo” verb form (which is used to express a command).
Fecha a porta, pois está frio paused audio playing audio Play slow audio Play normal audio Close the door since it is cold

Comments

  • I’m trying to get my head around the difference between these. Are these three interchangeable? As, since and because kind of mean the same in English don’t they? Does como have to come of the beginning of the sentence? Thanks for your help, it really is very much appreciated.

    • Good question, Angela. These three are pretty much identical in terms of the idea they convey, but they are not all interchangeable. The only interchangeable conjunctions here are “porque” and “pois” – of these, “porque” is the most commonly used and it also sounds less formal than “pois”. They’re both typically used in the middle of a sentence. Unlike those two, “Como” opens the sentence, like you said. That’s just about the only difference between them.

  • Living in the Algarve we hear ‘pois, pois’ a lot (particularly when people are on the phone). Any ideas what the English equivalent would be when it is used in this way?

    • It depends on context and tone. It can be perfectly neutral or quite sarcastic. Either way, it’s comparable to “Right…”, “I see…”, “Yeah…” in English – it’s kind of a filler 🙂

What Did You Think? Leave Us a Comment Below:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


The subject is used only for admin purposes and won't be displayed in your comment.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.