Haver Indicating Future Action

Finally, Haver can also be used indicate that someone will do something at some point in the future. To use it like this, we conjugate the verb in the Present Indicative tense and add the preposition “de”. Examples:
Hei de visitar a minha avó. I shall visit my grandmother.
Hás de ir a França um dia. You shall go to France one day.
When used in this fashion, Haver is a rather formal way of describing a future action or intention.
Haver can also be used in a similar fashion to make a request. When Haver + de is used to ask for something, it implies “in the future, as soon as you have the time/it is convenient”. Confused? Let’s look at a couple of examples:
Hás de me ver se tenho nódoas no casaco. Check my jacket for stains, would you?
Vocês hão de me preencher estas folhas. Fill in these sheets, will you?
Sr. Pereira, há de me ver se tem o meu agrafador. Mr. Pereira, could you check whether you have my stapler?
These requests don’t exactly sound like normal requests in Portuguese, do they? Nevertheless, they’re a colloquial and often-used way to ask things of someone with whom you have at least a bit of familiarity.
NOTE: Before the Orthographic Agreement of 1990, these particular usages of the verb Haver were easier to spot, since there was a hyphen connecting “de” to the conjugated verb. Examples:
Hei-de visitar a minha avó. I shall visit my grandmother.
Hás-de ir a França um dia. You shall go to France one day.
Now you’ll know what it means if you spot these written down!